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In celebration of World Crocodile Day, experts release saltwater crocodiles into the wild in India

Since the start of the program, they released over 2,000 crocodiles back into the wild. As of now, the facility houses 96 hatchlings and 12 adult crocodiles, including six breeding pairs.

  • 8 months ago
  • July 5, 2023
4 min read
Several species of crocodile face extinction due to climate change, habitat destruction, irreversible development activities, and illicit hunting. Crocodiles are a frequent casualty of human-wildlife conflict. Several species of crocodile face extinction due to climate change, habitat destruction, irreversible development activities, and illicit hunting. Crocodiles are a frequent casualty of human-wildlife conflict. | Photo courtesy of Partho Burman
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Today’s photo gallery comes from Partho Burman of India. It features photos of the five saltwater crocodiles released in honor of World Crocodile Day (June 17, 2023). The celebration aims to raise global awareness about the problematic situation of endangered crocodiles and alligators worldwide.

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On June 17, 2023, in recognition of World Crocodile Day, animal experts released five saltwater crocodiles back into their natural habitat in the Saptamukhi Estuary, near the Lothian Wildlife Sanctuary.

These types of crocodiles, known by the scientific name of Crocodylus Porosus, are the world’s biggest crocodile species.

Back in 1976, the group built a crocodile breeding facility called the Bhagabatpur Crocodile Project to ensure the population kept growing.

One of the five young crocodiles weighed155 pounds and measured roughly five feet long. The conservation staff carried it on their shoulders for 500 yards from the dock and released it in the Lothian Conservation Sanctuary.

Artificial reproduction allows group to release thousands of crocodiles into the wild

By artificially reproducing this species, the Bhagabatpur Crocodile Project keeps the crocodiles from
going extinct.

Since the start of the program, they released over 2,000 crocodiles back into the wild. As of now, the facility houses 96 hatchlings and 12 adult crocodiles, including six breeding pairs.

During the World Crocodile Day celebrations, hundreds of wildlife handlers from several districts witnessed a live demonstration by Anirban Chowdhury, a reptile expert.

He showed them how to handle a crocodile in case it gets near humans. He shared instructions on how to properly trap them, determine the gender, measure them, label the eggs, and release them.

Anirban said that despite lacking vocal chords, crocodiles hiss, grunt,
cough, growl, and bellow to convey a variety of emotions.

Experts mark the eggs before putting them in the incubation center to ensure perfect hatching. 

Crocodiles typically live up to 50 years on average. Some of these crocodiles have been known to reach 80 years old in captivity.

All photos are courtesy of Partho Burman.

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