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March in Argentina calls for gender rights, end to gender violence

The Ni Una Menos movement highlights the lack of commitment on the part of the state to curb gender violence and femicides, as well as the treatment of justice in cases of disappeared or murdered persons.

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — On June 3, 2022, citizens commemorated another anniversary of the first Ni Una Menos march. The movement fights for the rights of women, trans, and non-binary individuals. The first march took place on June 15, 2015, after a series of events took place. These events included gender violence, femicides, and the lack of commitment from the judicial system and the State to respond. The incidents led to various groups coming together to organize a movement to claim their rights. Initially, women’s rights were the main focus. Over time, the struggle expanded to include gender violence against transgender, non-binary, and gender-fluid people.

The Ni Una Menos movement highlights the lack of commitment on the part of the state to curb gender violence and femicides, as well as the treatment of justice in cases of disappeared or murdered persons. From the first march, organizers achieved different objectives. This includes the implementation and discussion of laws such as the Micaela Law, Law 27,412 on Gender Parity in Areas of Representation, the Brisa Law, and the law of voluntary termination of pregnancy. Currently, activists continue to demand the implementation of these laws. Although the laws exist, the State does not fully respect them. Femicides and violence against different feminine identities continue to occur.

The most recent Ni Una Menos march on June 3, 2022, came after the COVID-19 Pandemic interrupted previous marches. This march called specifically for the effective implementation Comprehensive Sexual Education in all schools. It also brought attention to issues like ecocide, student debt, and separation of church and state. Finally, it brought attention to the still unsolved disappearance of Tehuel. Tehuel was a trans man who went looking for work and never came back.

All photos by Eva Velazquez.

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Eva is currently studying anthropology at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata. She is part of the Guide Service at the Museo de La Plata and a member of the Body Studies Group (GEC).

In her free time, she dedicates herself to taking photos and developing different performing arts such as dance, theater, and circus.